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Connected

Global Press Journal reporters capture what unites us through photos.

  • Reporter

    Miguel de los Santos sculpts tree trunks for the Sierra Hermosa Sports Complex in Tecámac, in the state of Mexico. One of his sculptures is a Mexican grizzly bear that went extinct in the 1960s, to raise awareness of the role humans play in the extinction of animals.

  • Reporter

    Nanha, 3, left, and Marianne Lukulunga, 5, play outside their home in Makiso, a commune in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo. Schools in Kisangani are still closed due to the coronavirus.

  • Reporter

    Macrina Mateo works on a piece of pottery in San Marcos Tlapazola, a town in Mexico’s Oaxaca state. This community in the Central Valleys region is inhabited by the Zapotec people and is known for pottery made from the yellow and red clay around its mountains.

  • Senior Reporter

    Farouk Kasozi applies cement to a home in Nsumbi, a village in Uganda’s Wakiso district. Kasozi says that although construction work has continued after the three-month coronavirus lockdown, jobs are limited.

  • Reporter

    Manuel Pacheco buffs a handmade piece of silver at his family’s workshop in Oaxaca de Juárez, Mexico. His family does traditional artisanal crafts that come from the Mixtec people.

  • Senior Reporter

    A stray dog rests in front of a row of shops near the Pashupatinath Temple in Kathmandu, Nepal. All religious sites have been closed since the end of March due to the coronavirus, including the main gate to the Pashupatinath Temple, a sacred site for Hindus. The shops that line the area are normally crowded with tourists, but owners have seen little business during the pandemic.

  • Senior Reporter

    Mawe Mawe, a musician, rehearses outside his home in Kitukutwe, a neighborhood in Uganda’s Wakiso district. Since the coronavirus pandemic began, Mawe has turned to tailoring clothes to earn an income.

  • Senior Reporter

    Jeremiah Gwate washes his hands at the gate to his homestead in Gungwe, a village in Zimbabwe’s Matabeleland South province. Gwate made the hand-washing station by wiring a plastic bottle to a stick, and he steps on the stick to tilt the bottle.

  • Reporter

    Alejandro Negrete puts on a helmet he made to look like an axolotl during the Rodada Axolotl 2.0 bicycle demonstration in Mexico City, Mexico. The demonstration was held to protest the construction of a vehicular bridge that threatens a wetland in Xochimilco, a neighborhood in the south of the capital. “It’s an axolotl because the animal is native to the municipality, it has been a symbol of Xochimilco for many years and it’s in danger of extinction,” Negrete says. “The few species that used to live in the wetland have already disappeared. Taking control with bicycles, taking some space back from the cars – which have always had the upper hand in this – is essential. Cars separate you, and bicycles get you to create communities.”

  • Reporter

    María Luna participates in a Mayan ceremony in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico. The ceremony honors the fifth anniversary of the declaration of the Maria Eugenia Mountain Wetlands as a sacred place. Locals and members of environmental groups gathered to honor life, Mother Earth and nature. The city of San Cristóbal de las Casas lies in a mountain wetland area, but the city’s growth and demand for housing have increasingly destroyed this natural environment.

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Country Spotlight

Zimbabwe

Reporter Spotlight

Reporter Spotlight

Vimbai Chinembiri, Reporter, Zimbabwe

In Case You Missed It

Democratic Republic of Congo

For One Community, a Simple Hearse Has Profound Effect

Mourners in Kirumba used to carry deceased loved ones to distant burial sites on wooden stretchers or strapped to motorcycles. The arrival of a public hearse helped ease the strain of death in a region that sees too much of it.